TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
James Dickey - Life Stories, Books, and Links
 
Biographical Information

Stories about James Dickey

Selected works by this author

Selected books about / related to this author

Recommended links
 
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
 
James Dickey   (1923 - 1997)
 
Category:  American Literature
 
Born:  February 2, 1923
Atlanta, Georgia, United States
 
Died:  January 19, 1997
Columbia, South Carolina, United States
 
Related authors:
Ezra Pound
 
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James Dickey - LIFE STORIES
 
 
3/28/1970     James Dickey and Deliverance
On this day in 1970, James Dickey's Deliverance was published. Although praised primarily as a poet -- thirty collections by the time of his death in 1997 -- Dickey's tale of four suburb-dwellers on a manly descent into camping nightmare is described as "an allegory of fear and survival" and "a Heart of Darkness for our time" by the critics; son Christopher describes it as the beginning of the end for Dickey himself.
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SELECTED WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Deliverance
fiction
 
Self-Interviews
essays
 
The Whole Motion: Collected Poems, 1945-1992
anthology, poetry
 
To the White Sea
fiction
 
 
FIND BOOKS BY JAMES DICKEY AT Powell's Books
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SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT (or related to) THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Elements: The Novels of James Dickey
by Casey Howard Clabough
literary criticism
 
James Dickey: The World As a Lie
by Henry Hart
biography
 
Summer of Deliverance: A Memoir of Father and Son
by Christopher Dickey
memoirs
 
FIND BOOKS BY JAMES DICKEY AT Powell's Books
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Academy of American Poets
Offers a biography, bibliography, and links.

"In 1961 Dickey gave up the work to accept a Guggenheim Fellowship and spend a year in Italy with his family. Two of his most famous volumes of verse, Helmets (1964) and Buckdancer's Choice -— for which he was awarded the National Book Award in 1965 -— were published soon afterward. Dickey then taught, lectured, and wrote. From 1966 to 1968 he held the position of Poetry Consultant to the Library of Congress, an office that would later become the Poet Laureate. In 1970 he penned his best-selling novel, Deliverance. The book, which was later made into a major motion picture, exposed readers to scenes of violence and nightmarish horror, much as his poetry had done."
Interview with Don Swaim
"James Dickey, decorated fighter pilot, U.S. poet laureate, and author of the novel, Deliverance, talks to Don Swaim about advertising, being on welfare, hunting, drinking, writing in his novel Anilam, the distinction between writing fiction and poetry, his writing style, and teaching poetry at the University of South Carolina in this 1987 interview." (27 minutes)
James Dickey in The Atlantic Monthly
Features audio of Dickey reading "For the Last Wolverine" and "The Sheep-Child," and the full electronic text to "May Day Sermon." Two articles are also provided: a 1998 review of Christopher Dickey's memoir, Summer of Deliverance, and a 1967 article in which Dickey and Robert Lowell are suggested as the successors to Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, and Theodore Roethke.
Modern American Poetry
Offers a short biography, chronology of events in the poet's life, selected poems, ("The Shark's Parlor" and "The Last Wolverine"), and critical analysis of "The Sheep Child" and "Falling."

"The early books, influenced obviously though not slavishly by Theodore Roethke and perhaps Hopkins, are infused with a sense of private anxiety and guilt. Both emotions are called forth most deeply by the memories of a brother who died before Dickey was born ('In the Tree House at Night') and his war experiences ('Drinking From a Helmet'). These early poems generally employ rhyme and metre. ... With Buckdancer's Choice, Dickey left traditional formalism behind, developing what he called a 'split-line' technique to vary the rhythm and look of the poem. Some critics argue that by doing so Dickey freed his true poetic voice. Others lament that the lack of formal device led to rhetorical, emotional, and intellectual excess."
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April 26, 2017
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