TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Emily Hahn - Life Stories, Books, and Links
 
Biographical Information

Stories about Emily Hahn

Selected works by this author

Selected books about / related to this author

Recommended links
 
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
 
Source: Estate of Emily Hahn
Source: Estate of Emily Hahn
Emily Hahn   (1905 - 1997)
 
Category:  American Literature
 
Born:  January 14, 1905
St. Louis, MO, United States
 
Died:  February 18, 1997
 
Related authors:
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Emily Hahn - LIFE STORIES
 
 
1/14/2004     "Nobody Said Not to Go"
On this day in 1905 Emily Hahn was born. Hahn would run away to the Congo, be the concubine of a Shanghai poet, have a child with the head of the British Secret Service in Hong Kong, be a pioneer in environmentalism, and write fifty-two books. Roger Angell described her as The New Yorker's "Belle Geste"; biographer Ken Cuthbertson chose her most characteristic line as his title: "Nobody Said Not to Go."
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SELECTED WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR
 
 
China to Me
memoirs
 
England to Me
autobiography
 
Love Conquers Nothing: A Glandular History of Civilization
non-fiction
 
No Hurry to Get Home: The Memoir of the New Yorker Writer Whose Unconventional Life and Adventures Spanned the 20th Century
memoirs
 
The Soong Sisters
biography
 
 
FIND BOOKS BY EMILY HAHN AT Powell's Books
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SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT (or related to) THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Nobody Said Not to Go: The Life, Loves, and Adventures of Emily Hahn
by Ken Cuthbertson
biography
 
FIND BOOKS BY EMILY HAHN AT Powell's Books
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A Celebration of Women Writers
An annotated bibliography offers a chronological index of works by the author, split into the following categories: autobiography, biography, fiction, humor, juvenile literature, non-fiction, short stories, and travel.
Article: "The Big Smoke"
Find an article by Hahn, original published in The New Yorker, about the widespread use of opium in 1930s Shanghai.

"As a newcomer, I couldn't have known that a lot of the drug was being used here, there, and everywhere in town. I had no way of recognizing the smell, though it pervaded the poorer districts. I assumed that the odor, something like burning caramel or those herbal cigarettes smoked by asthmatics, was just part of the mysterious effluvia produced in Chinese cookhouses. Walking happily through side streets and alleys, pausing here and there to let a rickshaw or a cart trundle by, I would sniff and move on, unaware that someone close at hand was indulging in what the books called that vile, accursed drug. Naturally I never saw a culprit, since even in permissive Shanghai opium smoking was supposed to be illegal...."
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April 30, 2017
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