TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Boris Pasternak - Life Stories, Books, and Links
 
Biographical Information

Stories about Boris Pasternak

Selected works by this author

Selected books about / related to this author

Recommended links
 
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
 
Picture of Boris Pasternak, author of Doctor Zhivago; Russian literature, twentieth century
Boris Pasternak   (1890 - 1960)
 
Category:  Russian Literature
 
Born:  February 10, 1890
Moscow, Russia
 
Died:  May 30, 1960
Peredelkino, Russia
 
Related authors:
Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Osip Mandelstam
 
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Boris Pasternak - LIFE STORIES
 
 
1/15/1891     The Mandelstams: Hope Against Hope
On this day in 1891 the Russian poet Osip Mandelstam was born. While by no means the only writer driven to death by Stalin's Reign of Terror, Mandelstam became the symbol of all those so destroyed. This is partly because of his poetry -- most rank him among the best Russian poets, some among the best of all 20th century poets -- and partly because of his wife, who salvaged his work and told his story in her memoir, Hope Against Hope.
5/30/1960     Pasternak & Persecution
On this day in 1960 Boris Pasternak died, at the age of seventy. Pasternak's last years were dominated by the publicity and persecution which attended the publication of Doctor Zhivago. The Soviet line, communicated by quiet threat and noisy rhetoric, was that Pasternak and his novel were anti-communist; but he was also the subject of contempt from many of his peers, who believed that he acted cowardly in his complacency toward the Soviet regime.
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SELECTED WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Correspondence of Boris Pasternak and Olga Freidenberg
by Boris Pasternak, Olga Freidenberg, E.B. Pasternak (Editor)
letters
 
Doctor Zhivago
fiction
 
My Sister-Life
poetry
 
 
FIND BOOKS BY BORIS PASTERNAK AT Powell's Books
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SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT (or related to) THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Captive of Time: My Years With Pasternak
by Olga Ivinskaya
biography
 
FIND BOOKS BY BORIS PASTERNAK AT Powell's Books
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Academy of American Poets
Find a biography, bibliography, and recommended links.

"In the late twenties came a new wave of intolerance and terror. ... It was a time of crisis, as Pasternak was well aware. Many writers and artists felt the [temptation] to commit suicide. Pasternak believed that, for the poet, it was was essential to overcome this temptation and the fear of the future, and to continue working when art and even spiritual existence were no longer secure, a theory Pasternak expressed through the metaphor of 'second birth.'"
Boris Pasternak, 1958 Nobel Prize in Literature
Pasternak was awarded the 1958 Nobel Prize in Literature "for his important achievement both in contemporary lyrical poetry and in the field of the great Russian epic tradition." Visit the official Nobel website for an author biography, Pasternak's Swedish Nobel Stamps, and other resources.
Literature, Arts, and Medicine Database
A summary of Doctor Zhivago and brief commentary.

"For Dr. Zhivago, philosophy, literature, and medicine are all part of the same thing. They all are spaces in which he can express his love and respect for the beauty of life. In all these spheres, he is undogmatic, unrational, but wholly devoted to justice."
Pasternak's Hamlet
Offers a biography, commentary by Pasternak on Hamlet ("... the drama of a high destiny, of a life devoted and preordained to a heroic task."), and essays on the author's 1941 translation of the Shakeapeare's classic work.

"If Pasternak's Hamlet lacks some elements of Shakespeare's tragic vision, it does not lack those difficult-to-define qualities which make a literary work a work of art. There is a story often told concerning this translation: A pedant once came to Pasternak's door to charge him with a long list of inaccuracies in his Hamlet. Pasternak's response was laughter, a shrug, and the statement: 'What difference does it make? Shakespeare and I -- we're both geniuses, aren't we?' Max Hayward, who reports the incident as having been told him by Voznesensky, adds that this particular translation is today considered 'one of the glories of Russian literature.'"
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March 30, 2017
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