TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Andrew Carnegie - Life Stories, Books, and Links
 
Biographical Information

Stories about Andrew Carnegie

Selected works by this author

Selected books about / related to this author

Recommended links
 
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
 
Picture of Andrew Carnegie, American industrialist and philanthropist
Andrew Carnegie   (1835 - 1919)
 
Category:  American Literature
 
Born:  November 25, 1835
Dunfermline, Scotland
 
Died:  August 11, 1919
Shadowbrook, Massachusetts, United States
 
Related authors:
Alfred Nobel, Oxford English Dictionary, Roget's Thesaurus, William Shakespeare
 
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Andrew Carnegie - LIFE STORIES
 
 
3/12/1901     Carnegie, Libraries
On this day in 1901 Andrew Carnegie offered New York City $5.2 million for the construction of 65 branch libraries. Of the 56.5 million given by Carnegie for over 2500 libraries in a dozen countries, this was his largest single grant, part of a wider attempt to gainsay those who attacked his "Gospel of Wealth" and to live up to his famous dictum: "The man who dies thus rich, dies disgraced."
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SELECTED WORKS BY THIS AUTHOR
 
 
The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie
autobiography
 
The Gospel of Wealth
essays
 
 
FIND BOOKS BY ANDREW CARNEGIE AT Powell's Books
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SELECTED BOOKS ABOUT (or related to) THIS AUTHOR
 
 
Andrew Carnegie
by Joseph Frazier Wall
biography
 
Andrew Carnegie: Robber Baron as American Hero
by James Thomas Baker
biography
 
Carnegie
by Peter Krass
biography
 
Carnegie Libraries across America: A Public Legacy
by Theodore Jones
non-fiction
 
FIND BOOKS BY ANDREW CARNEGIE AT Powell's Books
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Andrew Carnegie Image Collection
Carnegie Mellon University presents this gallery of photographs that chronicle Carnegie's family, home, social, and business life.
History of Andrew Carnegie and Carnegie Libraries
A large annotated index of links about Carnegie's life, philanthropic endowments, and libraries. Find links to photo albums, biographies, historical records, and more.
PBS
Find a special online exhibit "Andrew Carnegie: The Richest Man in the World" offers a chronological timeline in the life of the famous American philanthropist, an extended biography, a look into the steel and railroad businesses, the importance of Pittsburgh at the turn of the century to the American economy, information about the strike at the Homestead Mill, a photo gallery of Carnegie's many residences, and more. Also features biographies of Margaret Carnegie (his mother) and Herbert Spencer.

"Carnegie was unusual among the industrial captains of his day because he preached for the rights of laborers to unionize and to protect their jobs. However, Carnegie's actions did not always match his rhetoric. Carnegie's steel workers were often pushed to long hours and low wages. In the Homestead Strike of 1892, Carnegie threw his support behind plant manager Henry Frick, who locked out workers and hired Pinkerton thugs to intimidate strikers. Many were killed in the conflict, and it was an episode that would forever hurt Carnegie's reputation and haunt the man. Still, Carnegie's steel juggernaut was unstoppable, and by 1900 Carnegie Steel produced more of the metal than all of Great Britain."
The Homestead Strike, 1892
Read a short account of the strike and strong-arm tactics that would taint Carnegie's reputation as a champion of the common laborer.

"The steel industry was crucial to Homestead, a borough situated on the left bank of the Monongahela River, just seven miles east of Pittsburgh. In 1889, workers had won a strike and negotiated a three-year contract for a sliding scale wage which was determined by the fluctuating market prices of 4 x 4 standard Bessemer steel billets. The contract was to expire on June 30, 1892. As this expiration date neared, steel baron Andrew Carnegie, who had often publicly communicated union sympathies, departed for Scotland leaving the notorious Henry Clay Frick with managing authority. Frick was known for his ruthless anti-union policy and as negotiations were still taking place he ordered the construction of a solid board fence topped with barbed wire around mill property. The workers dubbed the newly fortified mill "Fort Frick"...."
University of Virginia E-Texts
Find the complete electronic text Personal Recollections of Andrew Carnegie by Frederick Lynch (1920).

"Mr. Carnegie was the most original philanthropist the world has ever known. He evinced more genius in distributing money than he did in earning it, although he accumulated one of the largest fortunes known to history. One of the shrewdest business men that ever lived, he was an idealist. I do not know any other man who has combined in himself the man of affairs and the man of great vision so perfectly as he...."
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July 22, 2017
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