TinL Subscription
Recent Stories
Below are three recent stories from Today in Literature; just click through to read them in full. The introduction to all 500 stories in our archive is available to all through our list of authors, but you must be a Premium Subscriber in order to have access to the stories themselves.
 


October 12 France and the Surrealists [premium membership required]
  On this day in 1924 the French writer and man of letters, Anatole France died. In 1921 the Nobel Committee praised France for having "nobility of style, a profound human sympathy, grace, and a true Gallic temperament"; when he died, the Surrealists asked for permission to slap his corpse and then put it "in an empty quayside box of the old books which he loved so much and thrown into the Seine. Dead, this man must produce dust no longer."
October 11 Elmore Leonard, Bad Guys [premium membership required]
  On this day in 1925 Elmore Leonard was born in New Orleans. Leonard's view of his villains and born-to-losers: ". . . I don't think of them as bad guys. I just think of them as, for the most part, normal people who get up in the morning and they wonder what they're going to have for breakfast, and they sneeze, and they wonder if they should call their mother, and then they rob a bank. Because that's the way they are. . . ."
October 10 Pinter, Home and Abroad [premium membership required]
  On this day in 1930 Harold Pinter was born. The famous Pinter pause may have been learned as an only child in Hackney: at the age of eight or nine Pinter and a group of imaginary friends would gather in his back garden, where they "talked aloud and held conversations beyond the lilac tree." He also said he was deeply affected by being a child-evacuee during WWII: "'There was no fixed sense of being ... of being ... at all.'"

November 24, 2017
memebers Login
 
The TinL masthead features photography by Natasha D'Schommer , and the book art featured is by Jim Rosenau.
 
site by erich design
 
privacy policy »   site map »   »   FAQ’s   »   comments »